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MORNING PRAYER

Tell God your problems. 

Now is the time to write why you are ultimately praying to God in this letter. Tell him what is troubling you or share your joy with him. Whatever is on your heart, give it to God in this prayer letter.

  • If you are praying to thank God, try writing something like this: “I am thanking you because _________________ and I am grateful, Lord.”
  • If you are praying to ask for forgiveness, write something like this: “I come to you humbled and subservient, asking for your forgiveness. I am a sinner, but you have saved me by your grace and offered me your love even though I am not worthy.”
  • If you are praying for guidance, briefly explain the situation that is troubling you and ask for His help. For example: “I am struggling with the decision about whether or not to take this new job offer. It is a great opportunity for me, but I am worried about how it will affect my family. Please guide me to the right path and let me know what is Your will for my life.”

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Listen carefully, I have so much more to tell you -Jesus

Listen carefully I have so much to tell you – Jesus

All this I have told you so that you will not fall away. 

They will put you out of the synagogue; in fact, the time is coming when anyone who kills you will think they are offering a service to God.

 They will do such things because they have not known the Father or me. 

I have told you this, so that when their time comes you will remember that I warned you about them. I did not tell you this from the begtinning because I was with you. John 16:1-4(NIV)

Our Lord Jesus Christ didn’t leave us his children under any illusion about the consequences of following him. He urged us to be prepared for what is ahead of us

Are you prepared?

Jesus didn’t call us out to keep us stranded. He knew what we are going to face in these stormy times, He knew that churches would be under lock down

Jesus earlier told us in John 14:20-24, when he met the Samaritan woman at the well. You could remember that.

 20 Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

21 “Woman,” Jesus replied, “believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem.

 22 You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. 

23 Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. 

24 God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

My question is, my dear brethren, are you a true worshiper or you believe in church going?

Jesus reveals the cure of this situation/pandemic

but now I am going to him who sent me. None of you asks me, ‘Where are you going?’

 Rather, you are filled with grief because I have said these things.

 But very truly I tell you, it is for your good that I am going away. Unless I go away, the Advocate will not come to you; but if I go, I will send him to you.

 When he comes, he will prove the world to be in the wrong about sin and righteousness and judgment: 

about sin, because people do not believe in me; 

10 about righteousness, because I am going to the Father, where you can see me no longer; 

11 and about judgment, because the prince of this world now stands condemned.

12 “I have much more to say to you, more than you can now bear.

 13 But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you into all the truth. He will not speak on his own; he will speak only what he hears, and he will tell you what is yet to come.

 14 He will glorify me because it is from me that he will receive what he will make known to you. 

15 All that belongs to the Father is mine. That is why I said the Spirit will receive from me what he will make known to you.”

Jesus itemizes the holy spirit’s ministry in the life of the believerd. Meditate on them again.

How does this impact our lives?

Joy after sadness

16 Jesus went on to say, “In a little while you will see me no more, and then after a little while you will see me.”

17 At this, some of his disciples said to one another, “What does he mean by saying, ‘In a little while you will see me no more, and then after a little while you will see me,’ and ‘Because I am going to the Father’?” 

18 They kept asking, “What does he mean by ‘a little while’? We don’t understand what he is saying.”

19 Jesus saw that they wanted to ask him about this, so he said to them, “Are you asking one another what I meant when I said, ‘In a little while you will see me no more, and then after a little while you will see me’?

 20 Very truly I tell you, you will weep and mourn while the world rejoices. You will grieve, but your grief will turn to joy. 

21 A woman giving birth to a child has pain because her time has come; but when her baby is born she forgets the anguish because of her joy that a child is born into the world. 

22 So with you: Now is your time of grief, but I will see you again and you will rejoice, and no one will take away your joy.

 23 In that day you will no longer ask me anything. Very truly I tell you, my Father will give you whatever you ask in my name.

 24 Until now you have not asked for anything in my name. Ask and you will receive, and your joy will be complete.(John 16:16-24)

And then after a little while, sorrow will turn to overwhelming Joy to the children of God while the world celebrate their victory, but the believers brief, temporary sorrow will turn into Joy.

In similar way, we are in anguish and suffering today as we continue to await Christ’s return and deliverance from this evil age.

Paul also describes it as a light momentary affliction preparing us for an external weight of glory beyond all comparison. (2 Corinthians 4:12)

So, let us fix our eyes and thoughts on the return of Jesus Christ.

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Coronavirus: Paul’s Secret Spiritual Warfare Weapon(how to win any pandemic)

Paul’s Secret Spiritual Warfare Weapon


Spiritual warfare is a way of life for me. I am careful to put my armor on, stay alert to the spirit realm, and walk as close to the Holy Spirit as I possibly can. Still, there are seasons where the battle rages and I grow weary. There are times when I need reinforcements in the face of surging enemies that are intent on killing me, stealing what is rightfully mine and destroying my family and ministry.

Although I’ve long understood the need for intercessors, an email from a general in the faith this week—and an expert in spiritual warfare—reminded me of just how important prayer partners are. After asking about the warfare against me after my book, Jezebel’s Puppets

The email read:
“With the undoing of moral restraint in our nation and the intimidating nature of Jezebel against those who speak against it, I was wondering how you were doing. … I know a few folks who have taken a strong public stand against this spirit who subsequently experienced some added battle. I just wanted to make sure you have folks praying for you. … The biggest factor is to have intercessors who can pray for you regularly and also spontaneously. Part of the Ephesians 6 dress code is where Paul adds, ‘And pray for me.’ He knew all the mechanics of warfare, but he also knew he personally needed prayer.”

A Revelation of Reinforcements
Let’s look at these Scriptures first hand. Paul exhorted the church at Ephesus—and really all believers—to be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might.

“Put on the whole armor of God that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. For our fight is not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, and against spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places.” (Eph. 6:11)

That’s where many spiritual warriors stop. But it’s not where Paul the apostle stopped. He had another weapon against the wiles of the wicked one. And he had reinforcements that were making intercession for him from Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria and to the end of the Earth. He didn’t just hope they might pray when the Holy Spirit brought him to mind—he petitioned for their prayers.

Prayer Against Spiritual Warfare
Once we get past the whole armor of God and personal prayer challenge, we see Paul the apostle reaching out for spiritual warriors to join his intercessory prayer team: “Pray for me, that the power to speak may be given to me, that I may open my mouth boldly to make known the mystery of the gospel, for which I am an ambassador in chains, that I may speak boldly as I ought to speak.” (Eph. 6:19)

Paul asked for prayer for God to provide an opportunity to speak, be heard and spread the gospel message clearly (Col. 4:3-4); that people would accept his message and believers would accept his God-given wisdom (2 Thess. 3:1-2); for deliverance from the Jews (Rom. 15:30); for deliverance from challenging circumstances and prison (2 Cor. 1:11; Phil. 1:19, Philemon 1:22); that he could see in person those to whom he was writing (Rom. 1:8; 1 Thess. 3:10).

Final Words: Spiritual Warfare
Of course, we know that Paul returned the favor and prayed for his spiritual sons, co-laborers, churches and even his enemies. Prayer is a partnership. You need prayer, your family needs prayer—and the leaders in the body who are out there fighting devils, equipping the saints for the work of the ministry, and preaching the gospel need your prayers. I need your prayers. So I ask, as Paul did, pray for me.

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5 Hope-Filled Prayers for Christian Marriages

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In the midst of a marriage crisis, there is a very real temptation to focus on what is wrong, why it is wrong, and whose fault it is. This earthly focus can result in a hopeless state of mind. This hopelessness and discouragement makes us vulnerable to the enemy’s schemes to divide us.

Throughout the Bible, God offers us hope. He shows us over and over again that nothing is impossible when He is involved. He promises that we will experience peace when we keep our eyes on Him (Isaiah 26:3). Jesus literally spoke the words “Peace! Be still!” to a storm, saving the disciples’ lives while perfecting their faith in Him (Mark 4:39).

Our task is to believe, to ask, and to resist doubting (Mark 11:23).

These five Bible passages and prayers will help you to refocus on God who is able to do infinitely more to heal sacred marriage than you can imagine.

  1. Remember Me
    But God remembered Noah and all the wild animals and the livestock that were with him in the ark, and he sent a wind over the earth, and the waters receded. Genesis 8:1

God, I trust that You see me and know what I am going through. You saved Noah, his family, and the animals from the flood. You sent a wind over the earth and caused the waters to recede. I am waiting on Your winds of change, Lord.

Change me, Lord. Here is my heart. Cleanse me of impure motives. Reduce me to love. Let Your pure love be the driving force behind my words, my touch, and my tone of voice.

Change my perception. Help me to see myself and my spouse through Your eyes.

Reveal to us where we are making the situation worse by resisting Your leadership and disobeying Your commands.

Help me to wait prayerfully and expectantly for You to move in us and our circumstances.

  1. Encourage Me
    Many are saying of me, “God will not deliver him.” “Selah” But you are a shield around me, O LORD; you bestow glory on me and lift up my head. To the LORD I cry aloud, and he answers me from his holy hill. “Selah” I lie down and sleep; I wake again, because the LORD sustains me. I will not fear the tens of thousands drawn up against me on every side. Psalm 3:2–6

Forgive me Lord for being discouraged by those who do not believe in Your power. The temptations to give up outnumber the billboards in the city.

But You, O Lord, are my encourager. Shield my heart and mind from discouragement.

Remind me of Your great acts of love for Your people.

You fed five thousand with one boy’s lunch. You transformed Saul from a Christian killer into Paul, a Kingdom builder. You are able to do so much more for our marriage than I have asked of You.

I rest my hopes on Your faithfulness. I will not fear based on what I can see with my eyes. I will trust in You, the unseen God, to shield me and my husband from reacting to the enemy’s schemes to divide us.

  1. Reward My Faith
    Again he said, “What shall we say the kingdom of God is like, or what parable shall we use to describe it? It is like a mustard seed, which is the smallest seed you plant in the ground. Yet when planted, it grows and becomes the largest of all garden plants, with such big branches the birds of the air can perch in its shade.” Mark 4:30–32
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God, You have promised that if I offer You a miniscule amount of faith, You will create something so much bigger out of it.

Today, I offer You my faith in Your ability to bring Jesus into this world from a virgin girl. I believe that You breathed life into Adam and made Eve from his rib. You transformed Zacchaeus from a crook into someone who wanted to give back four times what he had stolen.

I believe that You, O Lord, can turn our bitterness into kindness. You can transform our self-focused stubbornness into a “your needs come first” mindset.

You are able to restore us completely and allow our marriage to point others to Your perfect love for imperfect people.

Let my faith become sight, Lord.

  1. Heal Our Marriage
    As Jesus approached Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging. When he heard the crowd going by, he asked what was happening. They told him, “Jesus of Nazareth is passing by.” He called out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” Those who led the way rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but he shouted all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” Jesus stopped and ordered the man to be brought to him. When he came near, Jesus asked him, “What do you want me to do for you?” “Lord, I want to see,” he replied. Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has healed you.” Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus, praising God. When all the people saw it, they also praised God. Luke 18:35–43

Lord, I want our marriage to be healed.

Let the healing begin with me. Have mercy on me, Lord, a spouse who has failed so often to demonstrate Your love.

I want to love my spouse the way You love me. Help me.

I want to be a vessel of Your love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control in _’s life. Use me.

I want to love in such a way that __ is inspired to praise You. Glorify Yourself in me, Lord.

  1. Make Me Brave
    Joshua said to them, “Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged. Be strong and courageous. This is what the LORD will do to all the enemies you are going to fight.” Joshua 10:25

Lord, I want to be filled with Your courage and strength. I want to live by every word that comes from Your mouth and speak boldly about what You can and will do.

The threats against my marriage are wimpy compared to Your great power.

Joshua put his godless enemies to death. He listened to Your voice and obeyed You.

You gave him authority to accomplish Your will. He commanded the sun to stand still, and You made it happen for the glory of Your name and the protection of Your people.

Teach me, Lord, to exercise the authority You have given me. Train me to hear Your voice and respond without hesitation.

Make me brave. Use me to war against the enemies of our marriage in prayer using the Sword of Your Spirit.

I believe You are able, Lord. Please help my unbelief.

With faith in Jesus’ blood and righteousness, I pray.

Amen

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What Nehemiah Teaches about Rebuilding after a Disaster Like COVID-19

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With the panic surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, we may wonder what society and the world will look like when this crisis ends. Small businesses fear that they may not be able to recover from minimal sales these past few months, people have been laid off from jobs, and schools have converted from in-person classroom settings to online.

Can we rebuild? What does that look like? How long will it take to recover?

We may have asked ourselves these questions as we watch the numbers on the news continue to rise. As the Bible has no specific guidelines on a pandemic like this, how do we look forward to the future?

But does the Bible have examples of people rebuilding after a disaster? Most definitely. As we take a look at a man named Nehemiah, who returned to Israel after a 70-year captivity took place in Babylon, we learn what rebuilding after a horrific event looks like.

Nehemiah helps to rebuild Jerusalem’s walls and city and Israel flourishes until Alexander the Great pops onto the scene, writes the Embassy of Israel.

Let’s dive into what Nehemiah can teach us about rebuilding after a disaster.

How Bad Was the Damage to Jerusalem?
Nehemiah may not have faced a pandemic, but when the Babylonians laid siege to Jerusalem, they left Israel destitute and without hope.

Not only did the Babylonians take the best of the best (Daniel 1), leaving only the poor and frail behind, but according to accounts in the Bible and Josephus, the Babylonians set fire to Jerusalem.

This means, when Nehemiah returns, he has to start from square one. They’ve burned the buildings, the stones, the foundations (Nehemiah 4:2), and it looks bleak. To top it all off, Israel’s enemies aren’t too keen about their return, and continually taunt and threaten Nehemiah, to prevent him from completing his project.

In essence, the situation looked bleak – much like our own disaster may now seem. Nevertheless, Nehemiah trusts in the Lord and proceeds with rebuilding Jerusalem. We can learn a great deal from when he chooses to do so.

It Takes Time to Rebuild
Although Nehemiah does remark at the surprising speed God allows them to rebuild once he arrives in Jerusalem, it takes a lot of time to get to that point. Ezra, another returning exile, returns with families into Jerusalem in 457 BC, and Nehemiah doesn’t start building until 444 BC, according to this timeline from BibleHub. That means 13 whole years pass before they begin repairs.undefined

To those exiles who arrived in 457, they may have experienced a great deal of sorrow and loss. The city they once knew, or had heard about from their parents during the Babylonian exile, has been reduced to almost nothing.

Nevertheless, once they begin to rebuild, they complete the wall before the year expires, and Ezra reads the law for the people, reminding them of God’s goodness and promises. When all seems most hopeless, God allows the people to rebuild and they flourish for about one hundred years.

Enemies Will Try to Deter the Rebuilding Process
Israel, throughout its history, has accumulated a number of enemies. And when the Israelites return from the Babylonian exile, they walk right into a group of foes who do not want to see the city rebuilt.

Sanballat, the governor of Samaria, and other Ammonites and Horonites, are less than pleased when they hear that the Israelites have begun to rebuild the wall (Nehemiah 4).

He first resorts to taunting.

As much as we hate taunting now, like when someone insults us online or in the workplace, taunting during Nehemiah’s time packed a whole different kind of punch. He prays that God handle the situation, and that his enemies will have their insults fall on their own heads. Then he goes back to work.

When Sanballat sees that they’re actually succeeding in rebuilding, he fights against the Israelites. They have to station guards outside the city to block his attacks (Nehemiah 4:9).

Sanballat also attempts to lure Nehemiah out of the city to do him harm, but Nehemiah pointedly sends Sanballat’s messenger back each time.

In the end, Jerusalem rebuilds, in spite of enemy opposition. Whatever God has brought together, no man can separate (Mark 10:9), and that certainly rang true for Nehemiah. In the same way, Satan likes to tear apart what God is healing or rebuilding. When God restores something, expect the devil to make an attempt to deter progress.

Healing Can be Painful
One particular passage really stands out in Nehemiah’s narrative: when Ezra reads the law for the people in Nehemiah 8. Most people, when he does so, react by crying bitter tears (Nehemiah 8:9).

They’ve realized in this moment how much they’ve lost. Perhaps they thought about all the family members who perished in Babylon and never got to see the rebuilt city. Or maybe they wondered if the Babylonian captivity would have never taken place if they’d listened more carefully to the law Ezra is reading now.

In either case, even though they’ve rebuilt, they realize how much they’ve healed from, how long those decades in Babylon felt. And this evokes an emotional reaction. In the same way, when we heal from a disaster, the process involves a lot of pain, a lot of mulling over emotions and memories we don’t want to unwrap.

Nevertheless, God restores us, even amidst the pain. There are times for mourning and celebration (Ecclesiastes 3), and sometimes those seasons can intermingle.

Why Does This Matter?
We’ve been told that the Bible doesn’t answer every problem. It seems to remain silent on issues like social media, dating, and COVID-19, since none of those three existed during the historical timeline of the Old or New Testament. But that doesn’t mean the Bible doesn’t have examples of godly people experiencing disasters, and how they coped and rebuilt from those.

Part of the reason why I wrote a modern-day Daniel set in a high school was because I saw how Daniel related to issues that teens experience now, and how his standing up for his beliefs plays an important role in how teens tackle difficult issues today.

The Bible is described as living and active (Hebrews 4:12). That means that no matter when the writer penned that particular book of the Bible, it can have relevance on our lives. So when we face rebuilding from a disaster, we can turn to Scripture for examples, for encouragement, and most importantly, for healing.